Microsoft Leans Pro-Privacy With Its Do Not Track Browser Settings

Microsoft has caused quite a stir regarding an updated product that hasn’t yet shipped. The new version of its Explorer web browser will be preset to reject tracking of a person’s online movements. The company’s Chief Privacy Officer, Brendon Lynch, confirmed in a blog post that Windows 8 (containing Explorer 10 web browser) will have Do Not Track (DNT) enabled as the default setting.  DNT tells advertising and analytics companies that an individual does not want to have their information collected or used.  Naturally, if your company’s business model relies of being able to track users, having the world’s most popular web browser (ostensibly) make that choice for its users, doesn’t sit well. By default, users would be opted-out of tracking. Opponents of Microsoft’s decision include the influential World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), which had asked the company to make it an option rather than a preset. Others theorize that advertisers may simply ignore users’ preference arguing that Microsoft, not the individual consumer, chosen not be to tracked. This is topical and raises several very interesting privacy questions that may lead to legislative initiatives or legal challenges.