If a Home’s Walk Score Is Low, How’s Its Parking Situation?

parking_ResidentialParkingWe’ve long known that a home’s walk score is a big factor in its value: A 2009 study found that homes with above-average levels of walkability (to amenities such as stores, parks, schools, and public transportation) sell for anywhere from $4,000 to $34,000 over homes whose walk scores are merely average.

Millennials in particular are taking an interest in walking or biking, whether for lifestyle or pocketbook reasons, thus sending the car industry into a state of worry about declining purchase rates.

Still, with one car out there for every two Americans, there’s a good chance that folks buying a house are going to want at least one spot for their vehicle, as well. The 2011-12 “Cost vs. Value” report from Remodeling Magazine found that a standard (not upscale) garage adds about $33,000 to the value of a U.S. single-family home — not enough to make it worth the $57,000 price tag in building a new one, but certainly enough to warrant calling attention to a garage that’s already there.

First-time homebuyers don’t always appreciate the benefits of a garage, but those who go without soon learn. Circling the block night after night in order to park at your own house is no fun. Neither is waking up to find that your car has been relieved of its catalytic converter.

With condos, or homes in jam-packed urban areas, buyers may have to pay separately for a parking spot. If you thought condo fees were high, get ready for some new sticker shock. As Bob Hunt reports in RealtyTimes, parking-spot prices in San Francisco have gone as high as $1 million, and in San Francisco, up to $90,000 back in 2011. Do we hear $100,000?

Whether you’re buying or selling, considering these proximity and transportation issues will help to both place a value on the property and  estimate the costs and ease of life for the owner.