In a Multiple-Offer Situation, Will Your Buyer’s Agent Shine?

applesThey’re making a comeback: multiple-offer home sales. With pent-up buyer demand, low inventory, and a widespread perception that both home and mortgage prices may be on the rise, stories of homes that attract two, five, or ten offers, and sell for far over the asking price, are becoming increasingly common.

If you’re a wannabe homebuyer, you’ll find it hard to predict in advance whether you’ll end up in one of these bidding wars. Not every home will become the hot property of the week. The move-in ready homes in great locations with tempting price tags seem to attract the biggest buying swarms. But, you never know–a fixer upper with great potential may suddenly become the darling of the week.

Some buyers try to avoid emotional turmoil by taking a hard-line approach like, “I’m just not going to bid on any homes where I have to compete with others” or “I’ll never offer more than list price.” That ignores market realities and may mean you wait a long, long time to buy a home.

So, let’s say you find yourself trying to make your offer stand out from a bunch of others. There are various strategies you might take, such as offering all cash (don’t gasp, it might just mean borrowing the money for a couple of months from family and friends, then turning around and getting a bank loan later), or waiving the inspection contingency (risky).

But the strategy I’d like to focus on today is making sure you’ve got an agent on your side who both represents you well and whom the seller’s agent will want to work with.

Real estate agents come in all personalities and levels of professionalism. And their skills and personalities will be on full display in a multiple-offer situation. That’s because the sellers and sellers’ agent will likely schedule the buyer’s agents for back-to-back offer presentations. You, as the home buyer, won’t likely be in the room. You’ll have to trust that your agent will represent you well.

What do these presentations involve? Your agent will need to do more than just hand the offer papers across the table. He or she will want to give a summary of your offer, highlighting its strong features and downplaying its weak ones (i.e. “Even if this isn’t the highest offer you receive today, look at how big the down payment is! My clients will have no trouble getting final loan approval”), and giving a picture of you as buyers (“They’re a lovely couple whose hobby is gardening, and they’re so excited that your yard already has mature fruit trees”).

All of this makes a difference. A bigger one than you might think. Sure, the seller’s biggest decision-making factor is the offer price. But other factors might make the seller rethink and choose a lower offer — and some of those factors depend on the agent him or herself. Picture yourself as the home seller for a moment. Wouldn’t you think twice about an offer where, for instance:

  • the agent already gives indications of being a hard-line negotiator, perhaps by asking for things that aren’t traditional in your locale (for example, to have the seller, not the buyer, pay for escrow costs) or peppering your agent with suspicious questions like,”What’s that new drywall covering up?”
  • the agent appears disorganized, shuffling papers around (“Gee, where did I put that letter from my clients?”) and making you wonder whether he or she will really be able to close the deal without mishaps
  • the agent insults your home in a misguided effort at negotiating, as in, “Of course, we would’ve offered more, but my clients need to set some money aside to rip out that overgrown garden and put in some real landscaping.”

And then there’s the factor that the agent doesn’t really have any control over within the conference itself: His or her reputation in the community. You may have never heard of your buyer’s agent before signing up with him or her, but the seller’s agent has. They may have worked together on many deals in the past. And if it was an unpleasant experience — or worse yet, the buyer’s agent’s incompetence or obstreperous behavior led a deal to fall through — you can bet the seller’s agent will be telling his or her client, “Look, I know it’s the highest price, but here are some very good reasons that we don’t want to work with these people.”

The bottom line: Check out your agent carefully before signing him or her up. Make sure you like the agent personally, and that he or she is highly thought of by others in the same profession. For more tips, see Nolo’s article, “Choosing Your Real Estate Agent.”