Charles Ramsey and Amanda Berry Story Illustrates Importance of Good Neighbors

htbh4_2When buying a home, you want to live near neighbors like Charles Ramsey, who will rescue you in a tough situation, right? By the look of it, Ramsey wasn’t living in a fancy house or in a luxury neighborhood. But sometimes other community qualities are just as important when homebuying — a truth that buyers sometimes forget in the midst of admiring the kitchen or reviewing the inspection report concerning the home’s physical condition.

There are limits on how much you can find out about your potential new neighbors, of course. Ramsey himself illustrates this, noting that he could have saved Amanda Berry and the other kidnapping victims a year before, if he’d only known what his neighbor Ariel Castro was up to. He says, “That’s why now I’m having trouble sleeping.” But he didn’t have any idea that the women were there; despite the fact that, “I barbequed with this dude. I ate ribs and listened to salsa music [with him].”

Such limitations shouldn’t stop you from trying to find out what a home’s neighbors are like. A good way to start your research is simply to knock on doors to houses surrounding the one you’re thinking of buying. You probably don’t want to ask whether they’re up to anything that the police would like to know about! Simply explain that you’re interested in purchasing, and ask about how they like the neighborhood, what they’d change, whether they know of any neighbor disputes or recent crime or problems on and around the house for sale, and so on.

If the neighbors are forthcoming, you may learn a surprising amount about both the condition of the house and neighbor relations. If they’re unpleasant or hostile, that tells you something, too. They may be difficult to deal with, or be carrying a grudge against the home’s current owners.

You can also ask the home’s seller for information, through your and their agent. Good questions might include:

  • Have disputes arisen with the neighbors? If so, how were these resolved?
  • Do you and your neighbors share the same idea of where your property boundaries lie?
  • Do the neighbors smoke, make noise, have difficult pets, or do anything else that impacts your use and enjoyment of the property? (This type of information may appear on the disclosure form, but most likely not.)
  • How do you and the neighbors handle fence repairs and trimming of trees on the boundary line? (Most of this should probably be shared, but if you find out that the sellers have been dealing with such things alone or shirking their duties, you’ll need to plan ahead for some delicate neighbor negotiations.)

Add your own questions as relevant to the area and property. And for more information on how to research a home before buying, see the recently released new edition of Nolo’s Essential Guide to Buying Your First Home,