When Is a Room a Bedroom?

bedSquare footage? Who cares about square footage? It’s the number of bedrooms in a home that’s usually the key indicator when sellers advertise and buyers search for homes online.

Which raises the all-important question: What’s a bedroom?

In real-estate tradition, a bedroom is a room that has a closet as well as a door you can close. Makes sense: If you’re going to sleep in a room, you’ll want to be able to close the door. And when you wake up, you’ll want to grab some clothes from the closet.

From the standpoint of the seller, this standard means that you’ll have trouble fudging the number of bedrooms. Clever staging won’t do it: Just putting a bed into a room doth not a bedroom make.

Unfortunately, that doesn’t stop some sellers from trying to expand the definition of a bedroom. I recently attended an open house for a place advertised as three-bedroom. The upstairs level clearly had only two.  The basement was unfinished. The main floor seemed to have all the normal rooms you’d expect on a main floor, with nothing resembling a bedroom.

I asked the agent, “Where’s the third bedroom?” Ruefully, she inclined her head toward a space off the living room that was obviously a den, with a couch and TV. No closet. The agent explained that the seller had once used this as a bedroom, and knew that people would prefer more bedrooms, so the seller insisted on advertising it as a bedroom.

Now, it’s true that buyers prefer more bedrooms. But for the buyers who really need a third bedroom for their large household, a room with no closet just isn’t going to cut it. They’re going to feel nothing but disappointment as they view the home.

And for the ones who are looking for a third bedroom because — as is common — they need a home office, there’s a perfectly good way to advertise it. Call it a bonus room! You see it in listings all the time, and the home-office seekers pick up on this quickly.  Such buyers might even prefer a home that doesn’t come with the price markup that’s expected for an additional bedroom.

Last I looked, the three-bedroom — no, make that two-bedroom — house I visited was still on the market.