Your Home’s Value: Who Wants to Know?

Paper house attached to yellow blank price tag on blue backgroundI normally don’t push syndicated content produced by nameless writers at marketing companies, but this article, “What’s your home’s price tag now?” makes some good points. (Despite an inappropriate title.) ((Could I be any more grudging in my praise?))

The idea is that, accustomed though we might be to thinking of a home’s worth as its likely sale price, there are actually three ways of looking at a home’s value. It depends on who’s doing the looking. These include:

  1. Market value (the likely sale price).
  2. Replacement value (costs of reconstruction, for insurance purposes, after a total loss).
  3. Property tax value (how much the government says it’s worth before sending you a property tax bill for several thousand dollars).

Understanding what each of these figures means, and how each is arrived at, will help you to both avoid confusion and know whether you’re paying an appropriate amount in taxes, covered adequately by insurance, and can sell your house for your hoped-for amount. The article itself explains these details well.

About that inappropriate title, however. Did you notice that none of these three figures would necessarily be the “price tag” that you’d place on your house if you were to put it up for sale?

Savvy home sellers do enough research (and get a Comparable Market Analysis or CMA from their real estate agent) to help them understand their property’s likely market value, but they then set a list price based on what will most likely reel buyers in.

Many sellers adjust the list price downward from the apparent market value, hoping to incite a bidding war that will ultimately take the price higher than they could have dreamed of listing it for. Then again, a seller may not want to set the list price too low, for fear that people won’t view the house as high-quality, or will wonder what’s wrong with it. See “Listing Your House: What List Price Should You Set?” for more on this topic.

There’s also one more measure of value that could have been added to this list: What amount the home appraises for. Before closing on a sale, the lender will doubtless require that a professional appraiser visit and attach a value to the property, as a way of reassuring the lender that it can foreclose for the amount it’s lending out. That appraised amount is supposed to be the “true” market value — but it’s sometimes less than buyers are actually willing to pay for the house, which can be a problem in some transactions. See “Low Home Appraisal: What to Do” for more on this.