Should Sellers Have Warned About Neighbors’ Holiday Lights Display?

holiday lightsHow would you feel as a new homeowner if, with Halloween barely over, you watch your neighbors get out ladders and start gearing up for a massiveĀ  holiday display — complete with lights by the thousands, inflatable snowglobes, an open garage full of displays, and music?

That might be cute for the first five minutes. Or if it were a mile away. But then your cat starts coughing at the fumes from the lines of visiting cars, the blinking lights create a horror-show strobe effect on your bedroom wall, and the tune to a certain carol takes up permanent residence in your ear.

So why is it that I’ve met scads of homeowners who say they weren’t advised of such neighborhood holiday shows by their home seller? In one case, it was the seller himself who was the local manic decorator — and didn’t warn the buyer to expect kids knocking at the door in December, wondering when the “Santa’s Workshop” in the garage would open.

Most states in the U.S. require sellers to warn buyers of not just physical issues with the home, but environmental or neighbor-related issues that could have a material effect on its value. In California, for instance, the Transfer Disclosure Statement asks about “neighborhood noise problems or other nuisances.” Not every light show is a nuisance, of course — but at close range, or when a house attracts unprecedented traffic levels, it’s no stretch to say the seller should warn the buyer. (Of course, most homes are sold in summer — and who’s thinking about holiday lights then?)

Oddly, I can’t find any record of U.S. lawsuits against sellers for failure to disclose local holiday light displays. It’s not as though buyers are shy about suing home sellers for nondisclosure, of everything from past crimes on the property to neighbors’ regular loud arguments and late-night parties.

And neighbors have brought lawsuits against the owners of homes with overwhelming displays alleging nuisance. (Perhaps that’s the more relevant path to getting results, given that a few bucks from the home seller isn’t ever going to fully compensate a homeowners for the lost sleep from those blinking red lights.) Some have even explored even more creative approaches — check out attorney Rich Stim’s blog on, “Can We Report Neighbor for Blasting Copyrighted Christmas Music?

Or could it be that homeowners feel just too Scrooge-like suing over what’s meant to be a bit of holiday fun? In any case, if you’re a home seller, you can avert some future bad feelings by telling your home buyer what’s ahead — or at least leaving them your Santa costume.