Should Your First Home Be an Old One, or Newly Built?

Brick entryIf you’re thinking of buying your first  home. chances are you’re a member of Generation Y (born between 1977 and 1994), had a median income of around $73,600 in 2012, and are looking to buy an 1,800-square-foot home that will cost you about $180,000.

How’s the crystal ball doing so far? (Actually, those figures are based on a recent “Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends” study by the National Association of Realtors.)

If those demographic descriptors describe you, you’ve probably already noticed that they are not, for the most part, within your control. The amount you’ll spend on a home, for example, probably depends largely on what you can afford and what’s available in your area.

But now we come to an important matter that IS within your control: Will you buy an older, previously lived-in home, or a brand-spanking new one, most likely in a development?

The differences may be larger than you realize: Older homes tend to be more solidly built, more affordable (though not always), and in established neighborhoods with grown trees and neighborhood character. Newer ones, however, offer the advantages of customizable finishes and features, adaptations to modern building codes and energy efficiency standards, and, because they’re often in communities run by a homeowners’ association, reduced maintenance responsibilities for the homeowner.

So, would you like to know what the other Gen Y homebuyers are choosing? (The drum roll, please.) The answer is: OLDER HOMES! Apparently for all the reasons just described. So if you have confidence that your fellow Gen-Yers know what they’re about, the decision has just been made for you.

But should it give you pause that the Boomers, just two generations up the line from you — who have already owned a home or two — are now mostly choosing to buy newly built homes? Apparently they got tired of all the maintenance as an older home starts to fall apart.

The real test would be, however, to ask these Boomer-buyers how they feel about their new home in a year or so. By then, they may be kvetching about how newer homes have thinner walls (“I can hear the neighbors’ TV!”), they can’t get a dog of the size they’d wish (because of homeowners’ association restrictions) and the hot tub leaks (hasty building with unqualified labor is epidemic in the new home world).

There’s just no perfect, obvious selection. To help you make that choice intelligently, see the articles on the “Choosing a House” page of Nolo’s website.