Sellers “should be asking us if we plan to hire a professional photographer”

chairThose wise words came from Teresa Boardman, a real estate broker and contributor to Inman News, in a column titled, “Sellers often have some old-fashioned ideas about marketing their home that don’t include photography and that thing called the Internet.”

With a title like that, need I say more? But I have seen firsthand how sellers assume that their real estate agents have a tried-and-true marketing plan and are up to date on technology and so forth. The sellers tend go straight to questions about how much the agent thinks the house will fetch, ignoring behind-the-scenes issues like what the agent will actually do to market the place.

By way of example, a friend of mine hired an agent after carefully researching several others in the area and checking out their reputations and references. She looked at the agent’s existing property listings, and didn’t notice anything amiss. So she didn’t think twice as she watched the agent go through her house with a camera, taking pictures.

Then, when she saw her house’s online listing, she was shocked. Dim, obviously amateurish photos made a charming house look utterly unexciting. By now, the house was listed, the open house was scheduled, and it was late in the game for a redo.

Anyone can take a bad photo. Here, I just took one for this blog, above. Notice how the light from the window creates painfully high contrast, and makes the space behind the chair look like a dark cave? A pro would never allow that.

Bad photos put a house at a serious disadvantage. First off, as Teresa Boardman and every other source of statistics will tell you, the overwhelming majority of homebuyers start their home search online. They no longer rely on agents to do the prescreening and show them possibilities in the real world — they can easily screen and eliminate homes themselves, based on what they see within the virtual world.

What’s more, online home searchers will be looking at a number of listings posted by agents who did shell out the several hundred dollars that it costs to hire a professional photographer. Some of those photos will make even the small, dark homes look like expansive palaces. (Ah, the miracles of wide-angle lenses. Next time you’re looking at listing photos, notice how all the refrigerators look like they’re about nine feet wide!)

So, yes, by all means ask prospective listing agents whether they plan to hire a pro. It’s not as though the agent will suffer by investing in this aspect of marketing — a successful home sale to an eager buyer will yield the highest possible commission to the agent, too.