Finding Solid Reviews of Real Estate Agents Still a Challenge

smart homeGoing online to find a home to buy has become so user-friendly, full of pretty pictures and fun bells and whistles, that some buyers have been known to proceed all the way to a purchase without once actually visiting the house. The Internet has become the “go-to” place for starting a home search. But it’s not yet the “go-to” place for finding a real estate agent.

Most agents have their own website, or at least a page on a website owned by the real estate agency for which they work. But the amount of information the agents offer up may be minimal, and is certainly not standardized. Some provide little more than their name, rank, and credentials — while others wax on about client philosophy, forgetting to so much as tell you that they’re members of, say, the National Association of Realtors (NAR).

Very few agent websites offer clients a place to post reviews and ratings. (Redfin is an exception here.)

Other consumer-rating websites have, of course, stepped in to fill the void, such as:

  • Yelp.com. Any consumer of anything online is no doubt familiar with this site and its opportunity for the world at large to rate services on a five-star system and write a lengthy essay about their experience. Potentially useful? Yes. But look at what it doesn’t provide — any independent, objective information about the agent’s credentials, work history, or success at matching buyers to homes or getting homes sold for a worthwhile amount.
  • Zillow.com. This is the site that every real estate agent is afraid will take over the world. Zillow offers a Yelp-like, five-star rating and review system — but again, minimal hard data about indicators like the agents’ transaction history.
  • Neighborcity.com. This tries to be the opposite of Yelp, by using “a sophisticated algorithm that analyzes Agent’s transaction history and active listings to provide the most objective and relevant rankings of Realtors in any area.” It’s a site worth stopping at for information about an agent’s experience and transaction history. But it feels like it’s still getting off the ground — I had a devil of a time getting it to search for agents in another state (it kept defaulting to my home area); many agents lack photos; and you can tell it’s a computer-run algorithm when you run into descriptions like, “he primarily serves sellers with Single Family properties in Seattle, Kent and Renton and the Interbay, None specified and Green Lakes neighborhoods.”
  • AgentAce. This is more than a review site, but plays matchmaker. It provides hard data about agents’ transaction history, then a live human contacts both the prospective buyer and suggested agent to set up a relationship — and the company takes a cut of the agent’s commission if it all works out. Great for handholding, but less useful if you just want to research agents online. (And it’s not available in all U.S. markets yet.)
  • HomeLight. This site also plays matchmaker, leading you through a long questionnaire before suggesting agents. It collects reviews, but as far as I can tell, doesn’t let the public see them, instead factoring them into its ratings of the agents. It’s operative in 34 U.S. markets so far.

Meanwhile, the great institutional behemoth known as the NAR has decided, at its national convention, that it “should develop a methodology to rate REALTORS ®.” That doesn’t sound like something that will happen tomorrow — especially given that one of its committee members hastened to explain that, “I know that the impression those words give are not in line with the intent of the objective. NAR, as an organization, will not rank, rate, or review Realtors.” Uh, guess we’ll have to wait and see.