Category Archives: Homebuying

San Fran Home Sells for $1.405 Million Over Asking?!

Paper house attached to yellow blank price tag on blue backgroundSeriously. You read that right. That bid brought the total price of the recently sold two-bedroom, 2.5 bathroom home on Gough Street to $3.4 million

I wonder whether there’s some other bidder out there who offered a mere $1.309 million over asking, and is now kicking himself for not having gone just a little higher? (Though what’s “little” in this context is relative, with every .1 million signifying a cool $100 thousand.)

While the article discussing this house on Curbed didn’t mention it, a price hike like this is a sure sign that a bidding war took place. (Either that, or some seriously misguided buyer thought a bidding war was inevitable or had money to burn.)

How, you might ask, did the buyer decide to go quite that high? Real estate bids are traditionally confidential. This isn’t like an auction, where everyone gets to hear the other offers and then raise their own bid by a bit.

But the buyers’ agents are allowed to, and traditionally do, ask the seller’s agent how many people have indicated that they plan to submit a bid. If it’s only one or two, the savvy buyer will probably bid something over asking, but not go crazy.

In the Bay Area, however, with a tech boom and a housing shortage, it’s not uncommon to hear of ten or more prospective buyers bidding on the same house. When up against that sort of competition, with only one chance to make your offer stand out, your best bet is to put an eye-popping dollar figure on it.

If you’re new to the real estate world, let this serve as an introduction to the fact that home list prices mean almost nothing until you understand what’s happening in the market where the house is located. Wouldn’t you think that a two-bedroom home listed for over $2 million wouldn’t require anyone to bid a penny more? But that’s the Bay Area market. Yours may differ! See Nolo’s article, “Home List Price: What Is a House Worth?” for a deeper discussion of this issue.

Should Your First Home Be an Old One, or Newly Built?

Brick entryIf you’re thinking of buying your first  home. chances are you’re a member of Generation Y (born between 1977 and 1994), had a median income of around $73,600 in 2012, and are looking to buy an 1,800-square-foot home that will cost you about $180,000.

How’s the crystal ball doing so far? (Actually, those figures are based on a recent “Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends” study by the National Association of Realtors.)

If those demographic descriptors describe you, you’ve probably already noticed that they are not, for the most part, within your control. The amount you’ll spend on a home, for example, probably depends largely on what you can afford and what’s available in your area.

But now we come to an important matter that IS within your control: Will you buy an older, previously lived-in home, or a brand-spanking new one, most likely in a development?

The differences may be larger than you realize: Older homes tend to be more solidly built, more affordable (though not always), and in established neighborhoods with grown trees and neighborhood character. Newer ones, however, offer the advantages of customizable finishes and features, adaptations to modern building codes and energy efficiency standards, and, because they’re often in communities run by a homeowners’ association, reduced maintenance responsibilities for the homeowner.

So, would you like to know what the other Gen Y homebuyers are choosing? (The drum roll, please.) The answer is: OLDER HOMES! Apparently for all the reasons just described. So if you have confidence that your fellow Gen-Yers know what they’re about, the decision has just been made for you.

But should it give you pause that the Boomers, just two generations up the line from you — who have already owned a home or two — are now mostly choosing to buy newly built homes? Apparently they got tired of all the maintenance as an older home starts to fall apart.

The real test would be, however, to ask these Boomer-buyers how they feel about their new home in a year or so. By then, they may be kvetching about how newer homes have thinner walls (“I can hear the neighbors’ TV!”), they can’t get a dog of the size they’d wish (because of homeowners’ association restrictions) and the hot tub leaks (hasty building with unqualified labor is epidemic in the new home world).

There’s just no perfect, obvious selection. To help you make that choice intelligently, see the articles on the “Choosing a House” page of Nolo’s website.

Huge Disparity in Home Affordability Across the U.S.

SFHow can an annual salary of just over $19,000 be enough to buy you a home in Cleveland, Ohio, while you’ll need a princely income of $115,510 per year to buy a home in San Francisco, California? Let’s just say that home prices, mortgage rates, and other economic factors vary tremendously across the U.S., as evidenced by a recent study by HSH.

The HSH study put together data on mortgage rates and median home prices in 25 of the largest metropolitan areas in the U.S., and calculated how much salary you would therefore need in order to cover the mortgage payments on an average home there. (And that’s before you start worrying about other costs of living, like local private schools.)

The results should make any Californian who doesn’t already own a home want to flee to another state. Not only is San Francisco absurdly difficult to buy into, but prospective Los Angeles homebuyers will need, on average, an income of $72,127, and San Diego homebuyers will need $81,570.

Even New York City starts to look cheap by comparison: An income of $66,167 gives you a shot at buying a home there, woo-whoo! And we can blame the dot-com industry for driving up rates in San Francisco, but why is Seattle, the home of Microsoft and Amazon, still affordable for folks with an income of $59,130?

No wonder the other big story in the San Francisco Bay Area is that rental rates are the highest in the nation. But if you need to buy a house in an expensive area, you’ll find useful information in the “Affording a House” section of Nolo’s website.

 

 

 

Unpermitted Construction by Former Homeowner May Affect Current Owner

outhouseRemember last week’s blog post, “Of Mice and Moss: Tales of Unexpected Homeowner Expenses“? A significant number of people contributed tales of — to quote one of them — “stupid repairs and improvements of previous owners.”

This of course raises the question, why weren’t the issues revealed during the home buying process? My guess is that they’re precisely the types of issue sellers are least likely mention on the disclosure form mandated in most states. After all, the sellers think of disclosures as where they list and describe problems with the property,  such as an aging roof or a crack in the basement floor slab.

But that beautiful new tile that they installed in the kitchen? That’s not a problem, it’s a handmade masterpiece! (Never mind that it ripples in a few places.) And the new bathroom that Cousin Ed created where the back porch used to be? Perfection itself! So perfect that they didn’t bother taking out a permit for it! (The inspector might not have understood Cousin Ed’s avant garde pipe installation style.)

If the former owner could live with some slapdash construction, the current owner sometimes can, too. However, complications arise when it comes time to sell the place yourself. What do you tell the buyers? Do you have to fix the problems? To shed some legal light on these issues, we’ve posted a new article to the Nolo website, “Discovering Unpermitted Construction When Selling Your Home,” by attorney Allison Nash.

Should Sellers Have Warned About Neighbors’ Holiday Lights Display?

holiday lightsHow would you feel as a new homeowner if, with Halloween barely over, you watch your neighbors get out ladders and start gearing up for a massive  holiday display — complete with lights by the thousands, inflatable snowglobes, an open garage full of displays, and music?

That might be cute for the first five minutes. Or if it were a mile away. But then your cat starts coughing at the fumes from the lines of visiting cars, the blinking lights create a horror-show strobe effect on your bedroom wall, and the tune to a certain carol takes up permanent residence in your ear.

So why is it that I’ve met scads of homeowners who say they weren’t advised of such neighborhood holiday shows by their home seller? In one case, it was the seller himself who was the local manic decorator — and didn’t warn the buyer to expect kids knocking at the door in December, wondering when the “Santa’s Workshop” in the garage would open.

Most states in the U.S. require sellers to warn buyers of not just physical issues with the home, but environmental or neighbor-related issues that could have a material effect on its value. In California, for instance, the Transfer Disclosure Statement asks about “neighborhood noise problems or other nuisances.” Not every light show is a nuisance, of course — but at close range, or when a house attracts unprecedented traffic levels, it’s no stretch to say the seller should warn the buyer. (Of course, most homes are sold in summer — and who’s thinking about holiday lights then?)

Oddly, I can’t find any record of U.S. lawsuits against sellers for failure to disclose local holiday light displays. It’s not as though buyers are shy about suing home sellers for nondisclosure, of everything from past crimes on the property to neighbors’ regular loud arguments and late-night parties.

And neighbors have brought lawsuits against the owners of homes with overwhelming displays alleging nuisance. (Perhaps that’s the more relevant path to getting results, given that a few bucks from the home seller isn’t ever going to fully compensate a homeowners for the lost sleep from those blinking red lights.) Some have even explored even more creative approaches — check out attorney Rich Stim’s blog on, “Can We Report Neighbor for Blasting Copyrighted Christmas Music?

Or could it be that homeowners feel just too Scrooge-like suing over what’s meant to be a bit of holiday fun? In any case, if you’re a home seller, you can avert some future bad feelings by telling your home buyer what’s ahead — or at least leaving them your Santa costume.

Getting a Mortgage During the Shutdown? Expect Delays

This isn’t speculation anymore. I talked to an excited new homebuyer just yesterday, whose offer had been accepted from among multiple bids on a home in Berkeley, but whose mortgage broker had warned him that the closing could be delayed.

IRS wall_0Why? Because the lender will need to get his tax transcript from the IRS, and as part of the federal government shutdown, the IRS tax-transcript department has been furloughed. Even if the entire IRS were to reopen tomorrow, chances are their inboxes are already overflowing with backed-up requests.

So now, our new homebuyer waits. And he’s not even applying for a loan that specifically involves approval by the federal government, such as a FHA loan, USDA loan, or VA loan.

Fortunately, most every standard home purchase contract in California is written with a contract contingency stating that if the buyer can’t get a mortgage, he doesn’t have to go through with the sale. Unfortunately, the homebuyer is expected to take care of this and remove the financing contingency by a date even earlier than the closing, or face the possibility of the deal falling through.

In unusual circumstances such as these, however, it’s worth remembering that contracts are nothing more than an expression of the mutual interests of the parties involved. In this case, I would think both seller and buyer would be amenable to negotiating a delay of the contingency and closing dates so that the sale can go through as planned, and everyone can get back to watching CNN to find out when the folks in Washington, DC are going to end this nonsensensical shutdown.

Condo Association Takes on Doggie Doo-Doo Dilemma

pup snowTradeoffs are inevitable when buying a home within a development that’s overseen by a homeowner’s association (HOA) or condo association. Your life is made easier by knowing that the association will take care of maintenance of the common areas and landscaping, and potentially even of parts of your own property, such as your roof.

But you give up some control — such as, according to recent reports, Fido’s genetic privacy, and your right to sneak off and hope that no one notices that your dog just left a deposit on their lawn.

Fox News tells us that The Grand at Riverdale, in New Jersey, has announced to its residents that they must have their dogs’ mouths swabbed for DNA analysis. Thenceforth, any stray droppings will be tested for a match. Owners will be fined $250 for the first offense, with subsequent fines ranging up to $1,000.

It’s a colorful (or smelly) news item, but probably not surprising to anyone who’s lived within a condo association. Their community rules can cover all sorts of issues: in the dog realm alone, whether you can own dogs, how many, how big they can be (by weight), and so on. (Oh, and by the way, Fido doesn’t really have any right to genetic privacy, in legal terms. Though while you’re at it, maybe you can check his ancestry!)

See Nolo’s articles, “Homeowners’ Associations (HOAs) and CC&Rs: Know What You’re Getting Into.”

Should Seller Allow Buyer to Do Pre-Offer Inspection?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThere’s a lot of buzz lately (at least in areas where multiple offers are making a comeback) about buyers getting the sellers of homes in which they’re interested to open their doors for a professional home inspection before, not after the buyer submits a purchase offer.

Buyers are being told that it will ultimately make their offer more attractive, given that they can, armed with extensive knowledge about the house’s condition, submit an offer with no inspection contingency. (The post-offer inspection, based on a contingency or condition written into the contract, is a time when negotiations often get contentious. Enough defects are usually found for the buyer to ask for repairs or a reduction in purchase price, and haggling over the details can consume — or derail — the entire process.)

Some sellers remain leery, however, of allowing pre-offer inspections. Let’s look at why, and whether these are reasonable concerns.

1) Sellers fear that the buyers will turn up defects in the property that even the seller hadn’t known about. True, this could happen. A seller who has lived in the home for years may have little idea of what’s been going on “under the hood,” so to speak. And once the seller knows of the issues, he or she will, in most states, be obligated to disclose them (or any of them that are “material”) to all other potential buyers. (See Nolo’s articles on “Preparing, Showing, and Making Disclosures About Your Home” for more on this.) As daunting as this might sound, however, it’s worth remembering that the truth about the house will likely come out eventually. Unless the market is super-hot and you’ve got buyers willing to waive the inspection contingency blindly, some other buyer will eventually conduct an inspection that turns up the defect, and you’ll be no better off than you would have otherwise been — or possibly worse off, if the buyers’ shock causes them to ask for a major price reduction.

2) Sellers feel they shouldn’t have to put up with an inspector in their home for a buyer who may not even ultimately bid on the place. True, if the inspection report comes back with a long list of defects, the buyer may get scared off completely. But there’s no reason to fear that buyers are running around casually hiring inspectors to write up reports on every home in which they’re remotely interested. These inspection reports cost a few hundred dollars a pop! Only a buyer with a serious interest in your home is likely to request a pre-offer inspection.

3) Waiting for the buyer to conduct an inspection might delay the process. Actually, this is more a concern for the buyer than the seller — as the seller, you don’t have to wait around for any one offer, but can put a deadline on considering them, and review other offers while you wait for the folks doing the preinspection to get everything scheduled and sorted. More and more home inspectors are, in light of this recent trend, making themselves available for inspections within a few days of being contacted by the prospective buyer.

Ultimately, the choice is yours, as the seller, as to whether to let a buyer conduct an inspection of your home before making an offer. But more and more successful home sales are now taking place this way.

“Dear Prudence” Is Giving Real Estate Advice?!

spookyYou just never know what people will decide to write to an advice columnist about. Only yesterday, a couple asked “Prudence” (Emily Yoffe, of Slate) whether they should buy a house that was the site of a horrific and widely publicized murder, in which the husband dismembered his wife. The couple work as a mortician and a pastor, respectively, so they aren’t personally freaked out by death, but they’re worried about what the kids and others will say.

Prudie’s advice is fine as far as it goes. She says if you’re comfortable with living there and want to buy the place, just be sure to tell the kids soon, and perhaps hold a prayer ceremony to . . . well, she didn’t say it, but I’m assuming to rid the house of ghosts and negative energy.

But there’s a lot more this couple should consider, namely:

  1. Their statement that, “Thanks to the Internet, we know all the horrific details of the case” is disturbing. It suggests they might not have learned about the murder from the sellers. A seller is, under most states’ laws, supposed to tell buyers, in writing, about anything that might materially affect the value of the house. If the seller did not, in fact, tell them about this, what else are they not telling? See my earlier blog post about a lawsuit by a buyer against a seller who neglected to disclose a murder/suicide that had taken place in the house for sale.
  2. Is the couple getting a bargain for the house? They’d better be. The place is, in real estate jargon, a “stigmatized” property. The fact that they may be willing to live there doesn’t change the widespread public perception that it’s tainted. Some properties of this nature remain on the market for years, or ultimately have to be bulldozed out of existence.
  3. Have they considered resale value? Once stigmatized, always stigmatized, if the event was horrific enough. And it sounds like this one may have been.

In the end, this couple may actually be the perfect one to buy the house and make it into a cozy, ghost-free place to live. (In fact, buying a stigmatized property is one of Nolo’s “Top Tips” for getting an affordable house.) But to the extent that a home is also an investment, let’s hope they proceed with their eyes wide open, and press the matter hard in negotiations.

Friday Real Estate Fun: “If You Lived Here”

HousesFor anyone who loves real estate, it’s good to stop and reflect once in a while on how the concept, shape, and style of what we call a “house” varies across cultures and time periods. And the book, “If You Lived Here: Houses of the World” contains artful images of just that variety. (Yes, it’s a children’s book, but one that adults can enjoy, too.)

By artist Giles Laroche, the book contains cut-paper collages showing everything from cave dwellings to yurts to Dutch floating houses to Venetian palaces. It’s accompanied by concise text explaining what the house is made of, where such houses are found, and what it’s like to live in one.

My favorite text comes with the cave-dwelling entry, noting that if you lived in one, “you would be among the 45 million troglodytes (cave dwellers) living in the world today.” (Gotta remember to use the word “troglodyte” more often.)

Perfect gift for a real estate agent who’s got kids, perhaps? Or a way to keep your little ones busy in the car while you visit your 25th open house? Then again, Laroche’s inviting picture of the Airstream trailer might make you forget your house-hunting plans altogether.