Category Archives: Real Estate News

Will a “Premiere Party” Help Sell Your Home?

mimosa iStock_000012039452XSmallThe trend-spotters at Oakland Magazine have been at work, with a recent article titled, “To Sell a Property, They Throw a Party.”

And not just any party: It’s a “premiere party” (usually for a luxury home in an affluent neighborhood), to which the real estate agent invites hundred of neighbors and other prospects.

They might serve champagne and hors d’oeuvres (will I ever be able to spell that without looking it up?) or perhaps chocolate chip cookies. They might create an art show with work from a local artist. One agent even commissioned a bagpipe player.

The odd thing is, most of the article discussed not what benefits parties like these offer the home seller, but what they can do for the selling agents, who — in the hot, hot, and already hotter Oakland market — find they’ve got to work hard to set themselves apart and attract clients. As one agent told writer Mike Rosen-Molina, “Listing agents are looking for tools that every agent might not have and ways to convince sellers to list their home with them.”

Okay, so do such parties really help sell your home? Especially given one agent’s acknowledgment that, “Buyers will see the home anyway; anyone looking won’t miss the property.”

The answer seems to be that such parties create a “buzz.” They get people talking, and create a sense that the property itself is an object of desire. And, while no agent quoted in the article came out and said this, buzz like this can lead to every seller’s dream: Offers over asking price, and possibly a bidding war.

 

 

Will This Year’s Real Estate April Fools’ Joke Be Tomorrow’s Listing Reality?

applesAnyone who didn’t read the “April 1″ dateline on Midwest Real Estate Data’s article called “MRED Makes Scents,” might have been shocked by this Illinois provider of multiple listing services’ announcement that it had “added a revolutionary new “Scent” field to all MRED property listings. The “Scent” field allows MRED agents to indicate the aromatic smell that prospective clients can anticipate when visiting their property.”

Meanwhile, just a couple of week’s ago — and not on April 1 — CNN came out with an article by Kieron Monk called, “Forget text messaging, the ‘oPhone’ lets you send smells.” That’s right, a new device (to be beta tested in July) will allow users to “mix and match aromas and then send their composition as a message, which will be recreated on a fellow user’s device.”

Just think, your real estate agent may someday send you a message saying, “You’ll love this house, just the place to bake a hot apple pie,” and then send you the corresponding aroma!

But is the oPhone going to be ready for the other most likely message? “It’s a fixer upper, but if we can pull up the cat-pee soaked carpets and give it a fresh coat of paint, I think you may have a bargain!”

Of course it will. The future is here.

Chances Are, You’re Buying Into an Underfunded HOA

condoThe financial troubles faced by homeowners’ associations — those being the governing bodies of many new-home or condo developments — have gotten worse over the last decade, according to Association Reserves, and as reported by Sandra Block in the April, 2014 edition of Kiplingers.

A disturbing 70% of them are “underfunded.” That means they don’t have enough cash in reserve to handle a major repair or an emergency that’s not covered by insurance.

And that could be very bad news for the homeowners buying in. An HOA isn’t some remote group that’s meant to take care of the homeowners in a planned community — it IS the homeowners in the planned community. When and if a major need for cash arises, it’s the homeowners who will be asked to pitch in and cover it, in the form of “special assessments.”

Did I say “asked” to pitch in? I meant “required.”  As described by Beth Ross in Nolo’s article on “When HOA Associations Can Impose Special Assessments,” “A well-run HOA also sets aside a portion of the periodic dues in a reserve fund. This fund is meant to pay for the costs of larger, infrequent expenditures, such as replacing worn-out patio furniture around a common pool, or putting a new roof on an aging clubhouse. . . . [but if the] HOA’s reserve fund is inadequately funded, . . . the HOA won’t have enough money when it comes time to make repairs, so — you guessed it — a special assessment will probably be on its way.”

As described in the same article, HOAs don’t have unlimited power to impose these assessments. But assuming they act within their legal limits, they do have power to penalize nonpayment — for example, by placing a lien or ultimately foreclosing on the homeowner’s property.

All of which is to say that it’s important to do your research BEFORE buying a home in a development. See the articles on the “Buying a New Home or One in a Development” page of Nolo’s website for more on this.

Joining the Crowd of Newly Built Home Buyers? Do Your Homework

valentines houseA couple of years ago, finding a newly built home to buy was as hard as finding an open seat in a nice restaurant on Valentine’s Day. The builders weren’t building, knowing that the buyers weren’t looking.

But last month saw a sharp spike in sales of new homes, according to estimates by the Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA).

A whole new crop of homebuyers may, for the first time, be considering the possibility of investing in a home that, at the moment, exists only in the form of a drawing on a map. It’s an exciting process — new-home buyers can often customize the place to their own wishes, from the layout to the counter tops to various amenities.

It’s also a time for caution. First, there’s the matter of construction quality. The model house in the development, if there is one, probably looks shiny, new, and perfect. But not every builder is attentive to quality, and some are more attentive to speed and appearance than anything else — leading to horrible customer surprises down the line, as described in Nolo’s article, “Newly Built Houses: Pros and Cons of Buying.”

Then there’s the fact that many homes in development — particularly, but not always, if they’re condos or townhouses — require all owners to join a homeowners’ association (HOA). That offers many advantages, such as someone to maintain common areas and watch over community quality and uniformity.

But it also means ongoing monthly dues, the possibility of expensive special assessments, and a level of control over your life that not even a landlord could exert. (“Sorry, your dog’s too big, you can’t fly that flag, and you can’t hang your laundry outside.”) For more on that, see “Homeowners’ Associations (HOAs) and CC&Rs: Know What You’re Getting Into.”

And when you’re done with all that reading, don’t forget to make those Valentine’s Day reservations!

Need a Real Estate Theme in Your Holiday Movie Viewing?

holiday lightsLook no farther than White Reindeer.” An indie hit described as a “dark comedy,” the movie features a lonely, pretty real estate agent (“Suzanne”) grieving after the death of her husband. No ordinary death, this one — he was murdered in their home while she was out buying the Christmas tree, in a robbery gone awry, which as she likely knows, makes it a stigmatized property and hard to sell.

Suzanne is falling apart: Christmas was her favorite holiday, and she’s getting nothing but further grief from family and friends. She forms an unlikely connection with the stripper with whom her husband was having an affair. She takes up drinking, cocaine, excessive online shopping (to a degree that will make any home seller resent having paid their agent a 5% commission), and other practices that you hope your real estate agent stays far away from.

The important question is, of course, whether you will learn anything about real estate from this movie? Well, the fact that the agent is pretty is already a lesson — studies have shown that houses sell for more if the selling agent is physically attractive. Beyond that, I don’t know — I’ll have to see it. Or you can see it first and tell me about it.

There WILL Be “Yes” Answers on the Disclosure Form

iStock_000000433950XSmallHas an entirely clean seller’s disclosure form — free of reports of home defects, environmental hazards, local nuisances, and so on — ever been accurately presented in a real estate transaction?

Notice that I said, “accurately.” We’re not talking about how a few misguided sellers, filling out the standard form that is required in residential home sales transaction in most states in the U.S., may think, “This place will sell better if I pretend it’s perfect.” I don’t think anyone is keeping statistics on how often that happens.

According to a recent column by real estate agents Tarpoff and Talbert (who write for various California local papers), what happens in a normal transaction is that, “There are always ‘yes’ answers” to questions on the disclosure forms about whether the home has various issues or defects.

That’s not a surprise to anyone familiar with the real estate world. A home starts deteriorating the minute someone sets foot in it, or even without the presence of humans. A seller would have to be utterly oblivious to overlook the cracked window, the door that doesn’t close, the in-law unit that the previous seller didn’t pull a permit for, and so on. Any seller with any sense of responsibility, or who is working with a real estate agent who explains that transactions go better (and are less likely to lead to later lawsuits) if sellers are forthcoming with the truth, will come up with numerous items worthy of disclosure.

But to anyone new to the process of buying or selling a home, it’s worth reflecting on the importance of (if you’re a seller) filling out the disclosure form accurately and completely and (if you’re a buyer) reading the form carefully, asking follow-up questions, and not panicking when you see some of those inevitable “yes” answers.

The disclosure form is, after all, an outgrowth of a shift in various states’ laws away from the old doctrine of “caveat emptor,” or buyer beware. That doctrine put the onus on buyers to investigate the home’s condition, and not to come crying back to the seller if it turned out that the basement floods every winter. (Just as it had for the last 35 years.)

That doctrine may have offered seeming simplicity, but what a mess for buyers trying to accurately gauge the value of the home they were buying. Not to mention the fact that neither buyers and sellers could be sure they wouldn’t meet again in a courtroom, with buyers alleging that sellers had gone beyond the confines of the doctrine and committed outright fraud.

Today’s laws and forms requiring seller disclosures make for a far better chance that the home-sale transaction will wrap up with everyone feeling well-informed and relatively unworried about later disputes. And now’s a good time to mention that Nolo’s website has extensive online information about the seller disclosure laws in various U.S. states.

You’re Not on TV: Look at More Than Three Homes!

Family TVAccording to real estate agent Jason Crouch (of Austin Texas Homes, LLC), real-estate-related cable shows like “House Hunters” “My First House,” and so on have had a noticeable effect on his home-buying clients’ expectations.

Not that he’s entirely complaining — he wittily titles his blog post on the topic, “I Should Probably Send Thank-You Notes to HGTV and TLC.”

The reason? These shows have managed to convince some buyers that they should make a decision after visiting three, or at least a small handful, of homes. Says Crouch, “Needless to say, I appreciate the idea that we don’t have to visit a virtually endless number of homes to make a solid decision.”

Indeed, some home buyers — pre-HGTV at least — are known for driving their real estate agents crazy with their “This one’s too big,” “This one’s too small” syndrome. They never manage to find (or, if it’s a couple, agree on) a home that’s “Just right.”

But visiting only three homes? That’s got to be a sign that TV is rotting people’s brains.

After so small a number, you’re only just starting to get to know your local market; to get a sense of what’s available at what price. You’re only looking at a small slice of what might be available within your time window. Ask your real estate agent — he or she probably already knows of homes that will be coming onto the market within the next six or so weeks. You’re putting on blinders with regard to the biggest financial decision you might ever make.

So rest assured, the cameras aren’t rolling, and your real estate agent will happily visit more than three homes with you. (And by the way, how often have you watched “House Hunters” and thought, “Gee, I wouldn’t have wanted any of those homes!”)

 

Hide Prescription Drugs Before the Open House!

pillsAll of our Nolo real estate products warn home sellers of the perils of leaving anything valuable in an accessible place during your open house. However, a recent headline from Washington State, “Real estate agent helps catch prescription drug thief posing as potential home buyer,” reminds us how relevant this advice remains.

The thief in question was ignoring cash, jewelry, and other valuables, and heading straight for the medicine cabinet in search of prescription narcotics.

When you think about how many people have some Vicodin left over from a past surgery — pills that they’ve probably forgotten are even there — you can see why a thief would figure this was a good bet, and might even reasonably hope that the homeowners wouldn’t notice the loss.

The sale of prescription drugs is apparently a big enough deal for the FBI to dedicate a separate reporting line to it: 877-RxAbuse (877-792-2873).

What can you do to avoid contributing to this trade? Clear out your medicine cabinets of all but the low-cost basics before an open house, and put any prescription meds in a locked area or even the trunk of your car. (Prevention is a far better approach than being suspicious of every house visitor who asks to use your bathroom!)

Not Buying a House Is Okay, Too

mens roomsEvery once in a while, a journalist asks me to make the “case” for homebuying. That shouldn’t surprise me: I write books about homebuying, I own a home, and I love walking neighborhoods and looking at homes. I even have a little collection of tin houses sitting on my office shelf.

But let’s get one thing straight: Loving houses doesn’t mean I’m an “advocate” for buying one. It’s a lifestyle choice, and the financial outcome is anything but guaranteed. Some people can (with the right landlord) be perfectly happy renting their whole lives. They’re mobile, they can enjoy weekends free of home repair obligations, and if the place gets seriously damaged, they won’t be the one calling the insurance company.

Why am I bringing this up now? Because panic levels seem to be rising right along with interest rates, additionally fueled by headlines like, “Families Blocked by Investors From Buying U.S. Homes.” (This article makes the point that, with rising demand for rentals, investors are moving in with all-cash offers that individual buyers can’t match.)

So let’s refocus on other voices in the media, such as that of Kelly Phillips Erb, in Forbes, with “11 Reasons Why I Never Want To Own A House Again” and Carl Richards for The New York Times, in, “It’s Not Everyone’s Time to Buy a Home.” They discuss varied reasons not to buy, from the amount of interest you’ll plunk down to the fact that you are the only true expert when it comes to your own life.

If you decide to keep renting (and I’m not advocating for that, either!), the most important thing to do is understand your rights as a tenant.

Nolo Mourns the Loss of Real Estate Writer Broderick Perkins

BJBPerkinsA man of immense talents and creativity, Broderick Perkins was perhaps best known professionally for his real estate writing with the San Jose Mercury News and on his website, DeadlineNews.com.

Here at Nolo, however, we felt lucky that he lent his talents to various projects, including writing online articles (tackling tough topics such as “Seller Financing: How It Works in Home Sales” and “Mortgage Rate Locks: How They Work“) and acting as an adviser/reviewer for the writing of Nolo’s Essential Guide to Buying Your First Home (which turned into a company bestseller).

Broderick Perkins passed away on September 29 of this year. It’s both a professional and personal loss for all who knew him. We will miss his warmth, humor, and insight.

Let’s conclude with an excerpt from Nolo’s homebuying book, in which Broderick explained what he liked best about his work: “Aside from the fact that I don’t have to go into an office every day, I appreciate the learning aspect of it. Every story is education for me. I used to get kidded a lot at the San Jose Mercury News when I didn’t own a home and was working on a real estate story–people from the realty industry would say, ‘How can you write about home ownership when you don’t even own a home?’ I’d say, ‘Do I have to rob a bank to write about crime?’ Now that I’ve been writing about real estate for years, I realize there’s no end to learning the details of mortgages, appraisals, the physical structure of homes, unique homebuying and selling experiences, and much more.”