Tag Archives: hiring

Hiring and Firing Rates Stay Low

As reported in the New York Times, the Department of Labor recently released its Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey. The survey asks employers about changes in their workforce over the past month: how many employees they started with, how many employees left or were hired, and how many employees they had at the end of the month.

The statistics show that the rate of involuntary separations — firings and layoffs – has stayed really low. Just over 1% of the total workforce were discharged or laid off in February 2013, the month for which the survey collected data. In fact, more employees quit voluntarily than were fired or laid off. However, the survey also revealed that hiring rates remain low, at 3.3%. With total separations, voluntary and involuntary, at 3.1%, you can see why the monthly job numbers continue to disappoint.

Among other things, these numbers mean that the unemployed are still quite likely to stay that way. There are just too few jobs opening up to absorb everyone who is looking for work. In response to this continuing problem, a few states and local governments — most recently, New York City — have passed laws prohibiting discrimination against the unemployed. Although these laws don’t magically expand the number of available jobs, they at least attempt to level the playing field by prohibiting employers from excluding those who are currently unemployed from consideration when hiring. For more information about these laws, and possible discrimination claims based on unemployed status, check out Discrimination Against the Unemployed.

Didn’t Get Hired? Check Your Facebook Page

There was an article in the New York Times last week about a start-up company called Social Intelligence, which exists for the sole purpose of running “social media background checks” on job applicants. The company sorts through everything on the Internet about an applicant for the last seven years, eventually creating a dossier not only of honors, charity work, and other good deeds, but also of racist comments, sexually explicit material, drug references, and weapons displays.

In case you’re wondering why employers need to outsource Internet searches, one of the answers is plausible deniability. As the article points out, these searches can yield plenty of information that employers are legally prohibited from considering in making job decisions. Perhaps an applicant is a frequent poster to a forum for women undergoing fertility treatment, immigrants from the Sudan, or Jews for Jesus. Maybe the applicant belongs to a Facebook group for parents of children with autism. Or, the applicant might have a blog recording her gender transition from male to female (off-limits as a basis for employment decisions in many states). Having a go-between collect the data and hand over only what the employer is legally entitled to consider creates a legal buffer zone.

I wasn’t surprised to see this type of company profiled in the Times, nor to see some of the things applicants have been rejected for (naked pictures, racist rants, photos of the applicant posed next to marijuana plants, or searches for oxycontin on Craigslist). Here’s what surprised me: One of the people interviewed, an EEOC employee, said that 75% of recruiters reported that the companies they hired for required them to research applicants online — and 70% reported rejecting applicants because of what they found on the Internet.