fitnessWorkplace wellness programs are booming: According to a recent study commissioned by Congress and conducted by the RAND Corporation, workplace wellness is a $6 billion industry (annually), with programs hawked by an estimated 500 vendors. (Unfortunately, Forbes reports that the study also reveals pretty minimal health benefits to employees and statistically insignificant cost savings for employers who adopt workplace wellness programs.)

The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, allows employers to adopt workplace wellness programs and reward employees who meet certain health goals. Understandably, the government has largely been concerned with making sure that employers don’t discriminate against employees whose medical conditions make it inadvisable to participate in certain activities or adopt certain health targets. (You can learn more about the final regulations on avoiding discrimination in our article, Final Rules for Wellness Programs Under Obamacare.)

Don’t get me wrong: I’m all in favor of employers offering programs to help employees improve their fitness, lower their cholesterol, lose weight, or stop smoking. And I understand that financial incentives are an effective motivation for most of us. But what about employees who are already fit and healthy? Many wellness plans offer an initial incentive to employees for taking a health assessment and participating in biometric screening, activities that are equally available to all. Beyond these measurements, however, some wellness plans offer additional rewards only to employees who need to change their behavior by, for example, participating in coaching programs, meeting certain health targets (such as achieving a particular BMI or cholesterol level), or participating in programs to monitor chronic health conditions, such as diabetes or hypertension. Employees who don’t need these types of assistance aren’t eligible for rewards.

Of course, good health is its own reward. But if money is being handed out, shouldn’t some of it go to the employees who are costing the company the least in insurance premiums? That’s what Eagle County, Colorado decided. According to an article at Workforce.com, the county’s HR director decided to reward the 25% of the county’s employees whom she described as “uber-athletes” with perfect health scores. She wanted to reward these employees and give them an incentive to motivate their coworkers. So, she gave them premium discounts on their health insurance and started paying their entrance fees for races and competitions; in exchange, they agreed to participate in workplace fitness teams, such as walking programs. Everyone wins, and the employees who are already costing the company less get to share a bit in the savings.