New York City’s Frank Slumlord-Shaming Strategy

iStock_000025162012Small-300pxStart spreading the news: New York City is making it increasingly difficult for bad landlords to do business in the five boroughs while keeping their reputation intact.

The city that doesn’t sleep has been pressing forward with a strategy of publicly shaming landlords who have displayed a commitment to making tenants’ lives miserable or who treat the city code like an inconsequential compendium of suggested practices. New York hopes that landlords who discover that their reputation is on the line—as well as online—will be inspired to change their ways. Plus, other slumlords with little town blues may think twice before letting them melt away by deciding to be a part of it in old New York.

King of the Violation Hill, Top of the Slumlord Heap

While it’s normally admirable to be exceptional, New York City landlords don’t want to find that they’re A-number-1, top of the Landlord Watch List. Four years ago, the city’s then-Public Advocate and current mayor, Bill De Blasio, started the Watch List with an admonition: “The city’s worst landlords can no longer hide from responsibility while their buildings fall into dangerous disrepair.”

Last month, Public Advocate Letitia James showed her office is continuing its support, right through the very heart of the initiative, by unveiling a revamped website highlighting the “100 Worst Landlords in New York City.” The website lists landlords who own buildings with a high number of outstanding housing maintenance code violations. These landlords can get the city to remove their names once they resolve enough open violations (see the Office of the Public Advocate’s “Criteria & Submissions” page for more information). Already, there’s some evidence that the list is prompting responses.

New Law Will Protect Tenants Not Longing to Stray

Under new legislation enacted September 30, New York City will soon begin posting on the Internet the names of landlords who are found to have violated the city’s tenant anti-harassment law. On the books since 2008, this law bars landlords from using threats or other types of action (such as cutting off utilities) to force tenants out of their apartments. In addition to this public shaming, landlords who illegally require their tenants to wear vagabond shoes could face a maximum civil penalty of $10,000 per apartment, which is twice the current level.

City to Slumlords: It’s Up to You

Given New York City’s growing commitment to shaming bad landlords into cleaning up their act, it may be true that if landlords can make it there, they’ll make it anywhere. As for slumlords who choose not to change their ways, they may indeed need to make a brand new start of it—in another profession.