iStock_000041523660Small-300pxIt’s unsettling to discover pests living in your apartment. Aside from being scary and annoying, the presence of these unwelcome visitors threaten a range of serious issues, from health concerns to property damage. Whether an infestation of cockroaches, mounting evidence of bed bugs, or a single sighting of a mouse is what’s causing alarm, landlords and tenants both have compelling reasons to move quickly to eradicate pests from their rental property.

But before you rush to fight pests at your building, keep in mind that it’s important to proceed with care. Taking shortcuts or acting recklessly can lead to greater problems, including apartment damage and tenant displacement.

Here are two costly mistakes landlords and tenants often make when trying to combat a pest problem that you should strive to avoid repeating at your building:

Mistake #1: Not Reading Directions Carefully

If you buy a pest-fighting device that’s new to you, be sure to read the instructions carefully and not gloss over the warnings on the label. In your eagerness to treat a pest problem, it may be tempting to proceed without learning about the proper use of a device and ignore cautionary statements because you assume they’re common knowledge or meaningless legalese. But even inexpensive products that consumers can purchase in a hardware or home supply store have the potential to cause substantial damage and serious injury if they’re misused.

One common example of such a device is a fogger, or “bug bomb.” If you’re not already familiar with this product, you should know that a fogger spreads pesticide across a room or an entire apartment through a mechanism of aerosol propellants. In addition to making sure you’re not present in an apartment while a fogger’s fumigation takes place, it’s also essential to make sure any pilot light (such as for an oven) is turned off before you begin using a fogger. If chemicals from a fogger come into contact with a pilot light or other ignition source, it can result in a harmful explosion (just ask Joe). If you’re not sure how to turn off pilot lights in an apartment, check with your local utility company.

Mistake #2: Not Monitoring Risky Pest Treatments

Sometimes, the treatment used to fight a pest problem takes a short time to apply, and then it’s just a matter of waiting for results. This is the case, for example, with a pesticide spray, which may eliminate certain insects either on contact or over a period of time. Other treatments, such as the fogger (mentioned above), may necessitate your leaving the apartment until the health risk is gone. But certain pest treatments involve a special procedure that needs to be monitored until finished. Leaving an apartment unattended while such a pest-control procedure is ongoing can lead to major problems.

Recently, the owner of a Des Moines, Iowa, apartment building used a large, commercial bed bug treatment heater to eliminate a problem in a vacant apartment. While the heater was left unattended, it malfunctioned and ignited a fire, causing $30,000 in damages, according to a report from The Des Moines Register. This incident prompted the city fire department to issue a public warning Monday on the risks of using such heaters to fight bed bugs, urging consumers to be present in case of an electrical overload that can lead to a fire.

As you can see, landlords and tenants who temper their eagerness with caution and diligence when it comes to fighting pests are likely to accomplish their goals without incident or catastrophe.