Final FMLA Regulations Cover Veterans and More

On February 6, 2013, the Department of Labor issued its final regulations implementing statutory amendments to the FMLA. These regulations incorporate the amendments Congress passed in 2010. Among other things, the 2010 amendments:

  • tweaked the way eligibility and hours are calculated for flight crews
  • expanded the right to take qualifying exigency leave to cover not only employees with family members in the National Guard and Reserves, but also employees with family members in the regular armed forces, and
  • expanded the right to take military caregiver leave to cover not only employees with family members who were seriously injured while on active military duty, but also employees with family members who exacerbated a preexisting injury while on active duty and employees with family members who are veterans suffering from a serious injury incurred while on active duty.

About a year ago, the Department of Labor issued proposed regulations implementing these provisions and seeking input from the public on a few key issues, including how to implement the leave provision to care for a veteran. Rather than issuing proposed regulations on this topic, the Department decided to hold off until it had received comments and issued its final regulations. As a result, the Department delayed the effective date of this provision. Until it issued final regulations defining the key terms (including who qualifies as a veteran and what constitutes a serious injury for a veteran), the Department took the position that employers were not legally required to provide this type of FMLA leave.

That has now changed. As of the effective date of the final regulations (March 8, 2013), employers are now required to provide FMLA leave to employees who need time off to care for a family member who is a veteran and suffered a serious injury while on active duty.

The final regulations have changed military family leave in a few important ways:

  • Veterans defined. One of the reasons why Congress amended the FMLA was to allow time off for employees to care for family members who had served in the military and later manifested serious health problems, notably PTSD. The final regulations define “serious injury,” and make clear that injuries are covered whether they manifest before or after the veteran leaves the military. The veteran must have been in the military in the five years before the employee first takes FMLA leave. However, the time between the Congressional amendments (October 28, 2009) and the effective date of the final regulations (March 8, 2013) doesn’t count against this five-year limit. The Department excluded this time because employers weren’t required to give leave to care for an injured veteran during this period. 
  • Qualifying exigencies expanded. As required by Congress, the final rule expands qualifying exigency leave to cover not only family members who are members of the National Guard and Reserves, but also family members who are in the regular armed forces and are deployed to a foreign country. This type of leave is intended to allow employers to handle practical matters arising from a family member’s deployment. The final regulations make a few changes to this type of leave. For example, employees may take up to 15 days off for a family member’s rest and recuperation leave (the previous limit was five days). The final regulations also add a new type of qualifying exigency leave, to allow employees to take time off to make arrangements for a military family member’s parent who is incapable of self-care. For example, the employee might need to hire a caretaker for the parent, tour care facilities, and so on.

The Department of Labor has issued a helpful FAQ set on the final regulations.