unemployedPresident Obama’s State of the Union message last week got lots of attention, mostly because of his pledge to work around Congress if necessary to achieve his policy goals. Among the President’s aims is to reduce unemployment and boost employee earning power. To that end, he announced in his speech that he would require federal contractors to pay their employees a minimum wage of $10.10 an hour. That figure didn’t come out of thin air: It’s the same minimum wage Democrats in the Senate are seeking for all employees.

A couple of days ago, the President announced another initiative in his “Year of Action.” He will require the federal government to take steps to avoid discriminating against the long-term unemployed in hiring. The White House had already released a “Best Practices” guide for companies seeking to avoid this type of discrimination; according to the White House’s press release, more than 300 companies have signed on. Now, by the President’s Executive Order, federal agencies will also have to comply with these practices, which include screening job ads for language that discourages the unemployed, reviewing interviewing and hiring practices to make sure current employment isn’t weighted unfairly, and casting a wide net in recruitment and hiring efforts. The President also announced a new grant program for partnerships between employers and nonprofit groups that seek to prepare the long-term unemployed to return to the workforce and help them find jobs.

A few states prohibit discrimination against the unemployed. Once New Jersey, Oregon, and the District of Columbia passed these laws, it started to look like momentum was building in the states. However, subsequent efforts have stalled out or — in California — faced a veto. (Find current state law information at the Discrimination Against the Unemployed page at the website of the National Conference of State Legislators.)

Currently, federal law doesn’t prohibit this type of discrimination by private employers, but the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission held hearings a couple of years ago on the topic. Might the President’s move rekindle some interest?